FAQs

No, unlike a solar panel on your rooftop, there is no way to guarantee that the energy generated would power your home. The power could be used by the building that hosts the solar installation. Or, like most energy generated in Illinois, it could simply be sent to the grid the moment it is created, along with a thousand other sources of power—from coal plants to nuclear power plants to wind farms.
Renewable Energy Credits (RECs), are the environmental attribute associated with producing renewable power. Solar, wind, and other renewable sources all produce RECs. For every megawatt-hour (MWh) of renewable power produced, a REC is created. This REC can be sold separately to the state of Illinois, which, under the Future Energy Jobs Act, is required to buy them to meet its own renewable energy goals. Depending on the solar agreement, either the subscriber can own the RECs and sell it to the state, or the operator will own the RECs. This will be outlined in the agreement with the community solar owner.
Yes. All subscriptions are portable and transferrable within the same utility territory. A subscriber can also give a portion of their subscription to another utility account number within the same utility.
All subscriptions are portable and transferrable within the same utility territory. If a subscriber moves within the same utility territory they can transfer their subscription to the new address. If you move out of the utility territory you will need to review the language in the contract with the community solar operator.
That’s a good question to ask when you are considering a community solar project. This language will be outlined in the contract signed between the subscriber and the community solar operator.





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